Beth Ann Bovino

U.S. Deputy Chief Economist
Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services
Biography

Beth Ann Bovino is the U.S. Deputy Chief Economist at Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, based in New York. In this position, she develops S&P’s U.S. economic forecasts and authors the monthly U.S. Economic Forecast, the quarterly U.S. Risks To The Forecast, the weekly Financial Notes and the Weekly Economics Call. Beth Ann has created Industry Drivers reports for analyst research. She is quoted regularly in the press and has appeared on many major television programs. Further, she has written many articles for popular and professional publications.

Before joining Standard & Poor’s in February 2004, Beth Ann spent over ten years doing economic and market research with Sungard Institutional Brokerage, UBS Warburg, and the Federal Reserve.

Beth Ann holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, a master's degree in International and Development Economics from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University.

Author Archives: Beth Ann Bovino

U.S. Forecast Update: High Anxiety

Although the sizable jump in U.S. GDP growth in the second quarter helped allay Wall Street worries, Main Street is still jittery. According to the August WSJ/NBC Poll, 71% of American adults think the country is on the wrong track (up from 63% in June) and that the economic problems facing the U.S. are mostly […]

U.S. Weekly Economic Roundup: Positivity Continues

Productivity rose 2.5% in the second quarter, consistent with a soundly growing economy but not reflective of the very strong GDP growth that characterized the second quarter. On a year-over-year basis, productivity is up 1.2%, consistent with only lukewarm economic growth. Manufacturing productivity growth was solid, while service-sector productivity growth was not so. Unit labor […]

After Several Years Of Steady Decline, U.S. Household Leverage Is Showing Signs Of Increasing Again

The great leveraging of America began in the mid-1980s with the wider use of credit cards and the introduction of home equity lines of credit. By 2000, household debt had grown to more than 90% of disposable personal income, and by the end of 2007, it had peaked at 135%. During the financial crisis and […]

Economic Update: The Start Of The End Of Q.E. 3

Economic Update: The Shutdown Wasn’t Free

Economic Update: Some Progress But Little Resolution

The U.S. Real Estate Spread Tightens As The S&P/Case-Shiller Index Grows

Economic Update: U.S. Housing Hiccups

Economic Update: The Economy Remains Unfazed By Fiscal Shocks, So Far

Economic Update: Mixed Results

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